Codependency Treatment Program

Codependency (noun)

  • Emotional or psychological reliance on another person.
  • A dysfunctional relationship where one party exacerbates another’s addiction by enabling it.

There are many definitions for codependency, but in the context of drug and alcohol addiction, it generally refers to relationships that enable someone’s addiction. The individual caring for the addict is usually trying to do a good thing and help them, but their behavior can often cause more problems than it solves.

Examples of codependent behavior:

  • Caretaking (cleaning up after them and hiding their addiction from the world).
  • Hyper-vigilance and protecting them from dangerous situations they put themselves in.
  • Covering up and hiding illegal activity, or lying to the police.
  • Rationalization
  • Feeling responsible for the addiction.
  • Ignoring their own wellbeing in order to look after the person suffering from addiction.

How rehabilitation treatment can affect codependent relationships

While an individual is seeking treatment, the person who they’ve developed a codependent relationship with can often feel left behind. The addict receives plenty of help and therapy, but sometimes their loved ones do not.

At our facilities, we don’t believe this is right. We have treatment programs in place for the family members and loved ones of the individuals we treat for addiction.

Our co-dependency treatment program:

Addressing the primary issues and identifying codependent behavior

The first step is to recognize what behavior is detrimental to both parties. If everyone involved understands what he or she is doing to encourage co-dependency, they can stop themselves engaging in it in the future.

Understanding enabling behavior

Enabling often happens without people realizing and can go way beyond the obvious (e.g. giving an addict money). Enablers often act out of a complex mixture of fear and love, and it’s not always conscious. Our therapies help people distinguish what is healthy and what isn’t, and become fully aware of their behavior.

Counseling and therapy

CodependencyA recovering addict’s loved ones have been going through the same journey, and watched someone they deeply care about on a path of self-destruction. We help the addict and the loved ones work through their experiences simultaneously, because everyone’s emotional wellbeing is important.

Enabling and codependency can make it extremely difficult for people to fully express their emotions, because they’re so used to prioritizing the addict’s feelings over their own. An open space where they have the freedom to talk about themselves is essential.

How friends and family members can aid recovery

We teach the family and friends of recovering addicts how to actively help them get better and prevent relapse. Codependent behavior is difficult to break out of without a plan, so we provide insight into what a recovering addict needs and what will hinder their progress.

One key thing to note, however, is that the full recovery of an individual is a responsibility that lies exclusively with them. Loved ones can help, but our treatment programs teach them the emotional dangers of taking too much responsibility.

Understanding that an addict is never cured

When an individual has recovered and leaves the care of one of our facilities, it can be easy for their friends and family to breathe a sigh of relief and think that the worst is over. Sometimes an addict never relapses, but it’s important to remember that relapse is still very common.

Our program supports families on an ongoing basis, so they can understand the ways their lives may have to change to support the recovered addict in their family, and how to help them prevent relapse well into the future.


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