Xanax Addiction Treatment

Xanax Addiction Treatment

When a person is experiencing mania, he may find himself engaged in common unhealthy and risky manic episodes such as drug use, spending sprees, and impulsive or unprotected sex. During the depressive phase, a person may find himself losing interest in activities that he normally enjoys, have very little or too much sleep, and worse, has suicidal thoughts or attempts. These mood swings can be severe and at times, a person can experience a quick shift of mood from depression to mania.

Niravam – a version of Alprazolam, which can be dissolved on the tongue.

Xanax is generally abused by those who enjoy its sedative effects and want to induce the effect more regularly than their dosage allows. However, addiction can sneak up on a user, and can happen quite naturally over time if use is consistent enough. If someone lives in fear of their anxiety disorder going untreated, they will have even more reasons to keep using Xanax.

Physical signs of Xanax addiction

  • Drowsiness
  • Sleeping for long periods of time
  • Feeling lightheaded
  • Memory lapses
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Inertia and sluggishness
  • Feelings of elation
  • Slowly building up a tolerance to the drug

Social and behavioral signs of Xanax addiction

  • Strained relationships with friends and family
  • Financial problems
  • Lack of interest in seeing friends or being social
  • Dependence and addiction

How dangerous is Xanax abuse?

Xanax depresses the central nervous system, so it slows down various aspects of mental function, including coordination and speech. Breathing can also be slowed down significantly, particularly when mixed with alcohol. Combined, they can lead to comas or death because overdose is so much more common.

Those abusing Xanax can find themselves unable to do normal daily things without taking the drug; this perpetuates the cycle of addiction and makes the addict feel unable to live comfortably without the drug in ready supply.

Long term use of a sedative can incur serious memory loss, typically affecting the short term memory. People who spend time with someone taking Xanax may notice they seem distant and unresponsive during normal conversation, as well as forget recent events and not notice the small details of a conversation. Large doses can cause someone to feel sedated for a number of days, making driving particularly dangerous.

Recovery from Xanax addiction

It is not medically recommended that someone stop taking Xanax suddenly. Sudden withdrawal can cause seizures, so it’s vital that the addict be supervised during the detoxification period.

Xanax withdrawal can involve:

  • Tremors
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia
  • Panic attacks
  • Sweating
  • Muscle pains
  • Palpitations

Inpatient treatment

Programs in inpatient treatment facilities help people recover because it the environment is completely temptation-free and very controlled. The patient’s whole day can be structured around developing healthy behaviors and patterns, as well as directing them towards things that will take their mind off their addiction.

Drug abuse counselors and group therapy sessions are essential during this time, as they help people feel part of a community and talk through their longstanding issues. Xanax is used to treat anxiety, so it’s likely that the individual will have existing mental health issues that need to be tackled.

Mind and body are undoubtedly linked, especially during the recovery process, so treating the physical and the mental holistically has a higher success rate than strictly physical or mental therapy. Many treatment centers offer yoga and art therapy alongside more traditional therapies.


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